Tag Archive: feminism

Accountability and Community: A Discussion About Justice

Accountability and Community: A Discussion About Justice

Monday, April 16th, 7-9 PM

@ The Orange County Rape Crisis Center

1506 East Franklin Street, Suite 302

Chapel Hill, NC-27514

What does “justice” mean in our work to end sexual violence and support survivors?

Please join community activists and volunteers from the Orange County Rape Crisis Center for an exciting discussion about community-based strategies for accountability and healing. This interactive discussion will address the pros and cons of the criminal justice system as a means of responding to sexual violence, and explore alternatives beyond it. Panelists will discuss transformative and restorative justice, alternative models for redressing harm and holding aggressors accountable, and our experiences with these processes in our own communities. Don’t miss this opportunity to re-imagine justice as we work together towards a world free of gender violence and all oppression!

Accountability and Community: A Discussion About Justice

www.ocrcc.org

www.internationalistbooks.org

An interview with Russell Maroon Shoats on Democracy, Matriarchy, Occupy Wall Street, and Food Security

Interviewer: How would you define democracy?

Maroon: In it’s broadest sense – to me – democracy is the ability of the individual to exercise self-determination in the core areas of economics, education, entertainment, labor, law, politics, religion, sex, war and peace; taking under consideration the need to both support and guide children until they can responsibly exercise those things on their own.

If one falls victim to believing what Marimba Ani calls “rhetorical ethics,” (the practice that has held sway surrounding the word democracy) then you would dismiss my definition as superfluous. Nowadays, however, more of the masses, globally, are accepting the fact that except for a small minority, democracy is something they do not exercise in any of those core areas.

So the question we must ask ourselves is “How do we construct societies where the individual is able to broadly exercise self-determination?

Interviewer: Do you find the concept of democracy to be useful to popular movements?

Maroon: For the already mentioned reasons, the exercise of democracy/self-determination is paramount at every stage of a popular movement, and for such an effort to remain true to the word “popular.” After all, individuals usually feel a need to look out for their own interest, and to promote and support democracy/self-determination goes hand in hand with that need. If a popular movement deviates from that, then it too will fall into the practice of utilizing rhetorical ethics if it continues to call itself popular.

Read the rest of the interview here.