Tag Archive: anarchists

An Incomplete Timeline of Recent Anti-Police Activity in the Triangle

chmarch1From TriAnarchy

The following is a timeline of anti-police activity from the triangle area in the last few months. We assembled this to help folks in digesting this recent period, connecting the dots of various, seemingly disparate kinds of activity, and strategizing about future efforts. This list is most certainly incomplete, and we would welcome any additions with links, pictures etc., which can be sent to triAanarchy@riseup.net .

Aug 15th – The Chapel Hill Police Headquarters is vandalized by a group of anarchists claiming solidarity with prisoner Luke O Donovan, incarcerated for defending himself from homophobic violence in Atlanta, Ga, and with the ongoing uprising in Ferguson. Police cars are smashed out and spray-painted.

August 22nd – Over 100 people hold an angry rally and proceed to march down Franklin St. In solidarity with the riots and protests in Ferguson. In response to a column in the Daily Tar Heel condemning the anger and tone of the protest, a piece is released online and in paper several days later that defends the protest. (more…)

Durham Herald-Sun: Protesters Rally Downtown, Block Highway

But while protestors shouted about a show of solidarity with the residents of Ferguson, there appeared to be no unity between two separate groups who came to downtown to voice their anger over the grand jury’s decision.

One group gathered on the CCB Plaza and used spoken word and other forms of artistic discourse to express themselves.

“We want to show solidarity with the people of Ferguson,” said Eric Jefferson, a graduate student at N.C. Central University, who said he is part of a group that calls itself Black Is. “This is part of life. Everybody is part of the struggle whether they realize it or not.” (more…)

A Short Communique from Durham

ferguson-protest-durham-freeway-112514-jpgRe-posted from Anarchist News

On Tuesday night November 25th, a group of people enraged by the police murder of Mike-Mike Brown, and inspired by the rebellious acts that have spread across the country, vandalized the Durham National Guard Armory on Stadium Dr. Messages were painted on the front doors and over a dozen windows were smashed out.

The National Guard is now on the streets of St. Louis and Ferguson, continuing the racist cops’ war on behalf of the rich against the poor.

This act followed an exciting night of protest in downtown Durham, in which a diverse hundreds of people spoke out about their experiences at the hands of the police, blocked streets, set off fireworks, spray-painted buildings with anti-police and anti-prison messages, and blocked the northbound side of Highway 147.

We hope all of these acts contribute to a continued escalation in local, combative struggle against racism, capitalism, and the state.

For anarchy,
XXX

Interview With Crimethinc.

tochangeeverythingFrom Mask Magazine – Interview by Hanna Hurr

To Change Everything, Start Anywhere

The radical milieu in the U.S. is vibrant and complex, but few projects last very long. Generations shift rapidly, and so do our projects. CrimethInc. Ex-Workers’ Collective seems to be an exception.

If you’ve ever lived in a punk house, participated in running an infoshop or social center, gone to an anarchist book fair or protest convergence, chances are you’ve seen CrimethInc. posters pinned to the walls, copies of Recipes for Disaster or Days of War, Nights of Love on the bookshelves, or stacks of Fighting for Our Lives pamphlets lying around. Perhaps you read the“Letter from Anarchists” at your local Occupy camp. There are few contemporary anarchist organizations whose work has passed through so many hands and been read by so many people as the CrimethInc. Ex-Workers’ Collective. In its twenty years of activity, CrimethInc. has distributed hundreds of thousands of books, posters, magazines, and stickers to countless people on all continents including Antarctica.

The idea that history is something we make by our actions, not something that merely happens to us, is central to CrimethInc.’s approach. In their familiar, high-fidelity way, they encourage people to take this history into their own hands. Tempting us to grab the steering wheel of our own lives and turn toward something that enables a more livable existence. Though the collective members remain in anonymity – some twenty years later! – the idea somehow persists that CrimethInc. can be anyone. (more…)