Tag Archive: solidarity

Sekou Kambui’s Parole Hearing Scheduled

sekouFrom Denver Anarchist Black Cross

Sekou’s long-delayed parole hearing has finally been scheduled for the 18th of June! We are making one last push for letters of support, petition signatures, and funds to get myself and another supporter (and more folks, if possible) down to Alabama for the hearing. In the state of Alabama, parole hearings are held outside of the prison, and prisoners cannot attend. Supporters, however, can pack these hearings, and it would be of great help to Sekou to have vocal support there.

Below is the link to an EverRibbon page set up by a fellow Sekou supporter in Colorado. If there’s any money you can donate, please do so here:

And again, please continue to send in letters of support for Sekou’s release, addressed to:
Alabama Board of Pardons and Paroles
301 South Ripley Street
PO Box 302405
Montgomery, Al 36130-2405
Chairman Clifford Walker
Associate Members Robert P. Longshore and William W. Wynne Jr.
Please send copies (and/or originals) of all letters to:
Aaron Schaefer
C/O DABC
P.O. Box 11236
Denver, CO 80211
Support letters and hard copies of the petition will be hand-delivered to the parole board on the 18th.
Letter Template [if you need it]

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Call to Action in Support of the Zapatistas

viva ezln** MAS ABAJO ESTA EN ESPAÑOL** (a version in spanish can be found below)

Week of Action: May 18-24 (Day of Remembrance May 24)

Justice for Galeano; stop the war against the Zapatista communities!

STATEMENT: 

Summary of recent events:
On May 2, 2014, in the Zapatista territory of La Realidad, Chiapas, Mexico, the group CIOAC-H, planned and executed a paramilitary attack on unarmed Zapatista civilians. An autonomous Zapatista school and clinic was destroyed, 15 people were ambushed and injured and Jose Luis Solis Lopez (Galeano), teacher at the Zapatista Little School, was murdered. The mainstream media is falsely reporting this attack on the Zapatistas as an intra-community confrontation, but in fact this attack is the result of a long-term counterinsurgency strategy promoted by the Mexican government.

Given the experience of the 1997 massacre at Acteal, we are concerned about the mounting paramilitary activity against Zapatista bases of support. It is clear that if we do not take action now, the current situation in Chiapas may also lead to an even more tragic end.

Why this matters to us:
Since 1994, the Zapatistas have shown us the bankruptcy of the world that dominates us and, most importantly, the ability to organize ourselves into self-determining communities autonomous from the political class and capitalism. It is this capacity to show that another world is possible in the here and now, one not rooted in exploitation, dispossession, repression and de-valorization, but rather in liberty, democracy and justice, that has inspired us all. An attack on the Zapatistas is an attack on the other world that we have all tried to build along with them for the past 20 years.  (more…)

Mothers Behind Bars

An exterior view of The Julia Tutwiler Prison for Women, in Wetumpka, Ala., Feb. 6, 2014. Corrections officers have raped, beaten and harrassed women inside the prison for at least 18 years, according to a Justice Department investigation, but the appetite for costly reform in Alabama appears minimal as conditions remain bad and prisoners are still fearful despite the investigation.

An exterior view of The Julia Tutwiler Prison for Women, in Wetumpka, Ala., Feb. 6, 2014. Corrections officers have raped, beaten and harrassed women inside the prison for at least 18 years, according to a Justice Department investigation. 

By Samantha Sarra/ From Truth Out 

For mothers behind bars, the prison walls are held up with patriarchy, racism and poverty. Injustice is the mortar that holds together the bricks of the prison industrial complex and the handcuffs worn by female inmates are still tightly linked to the shackles of slavery and oppression.

A law passed by the New Jersey Legislature in February 1804 declared the children born to slave mothers to be “free” at birth, but they still remained bound as servants to their mother’s owners until their 20s. Two hundred years later and true abolition has yet to take place with the continued racialized criminalization of poverty and mothers behind bars, whose children remain bound to generational cycles of trauma and discrimination.

The legacy of children being entangled in the repercussions of legislation continues as Republican Governor Bill Haslam passed a law last month in Tennessee criminalizing women for their pregnancy outcomes. The law, which will disproportionately affect already marginalized mothers, would make it a crime to carry a pregnancy to term if you struggle with addiction or substance abuse. The punitive prosecution of pregnant mothers, charging them with criminal assault rather than creating better access to health care, was a move opposed by major medical associations, the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy and the American Civil Liberties Union. (more…)

Pensacola Prison Books In Urgent Need Of Solidarity

open booksFrom Open Books

For those who were not aware, Open Books–a non-profit bookstore which houses the Prison Book Project–was hurt very badly in the recent floods in Pensacola, Florida. As you can imagine, books and water do not mix well. Due to three feet of water entering our store, we lost approximately 3000 books and have an estimated damage amount at $10,000. We also lost a considerable amount of the stock for the Prison Book Project.

If you are not familiar with us, all of the proceeds at Open Books goes directly to fund the Prison Book Project. The Prison Book Project, which runs out of our store, has been in operation for 14 years. We have survived several hurricanes, flooding, and numerous economic calamities. However, this flood hit us very hard.

In the past, we have been incredibly fortunate to have great support throughout our various communities, both local and international. We have supported numerous prison books projects throughout the country. We’ve donated resources to several up-and- coming prison books projects, we have held fundraisers for others in need, we have taken thousands of letters from other projects which were in trouble, and have offered our experience to those who might need help. With the help of these communities in the spirit of mutual aid, we have been able to function for over a decade now, a great feat for any prison book project. And although we know everyone’s projects are always functioning on a shoestring budget, we reluctantly feel the need to ask for your help.

Many have asked what are the best ways to help. The best ways in which you can help us are as follows: (more…)