Tag Archive: prisoner resistance

Prisoners Seize Private Prison in Mississippi

(from capitalist press)

The inmates have taken over the asylum.

A privately-owned prison in Natchez, Mississippi has been taken over by prisoners after a riot broke out on Sunday. This prison is mostly occupied by Mexican illegal immigrants arrested on drug charges and awaiting deportation. As of May 21st, the prisoners still had control over the building.

Eight prison employees are currently inside of the building and one, a 23-year-old guard, has been killed, dying from blunt force trauma to the head. Five other prison employees and an inmate were injured and sent to a hospital outside the facility.

Witnesses and neighbors living near the prison say they have seen smoke coming from the prison after a fire was lit.

The company that owns the prison, Corrections Corporation of America, says they have deployed special response teams, including local law enforcement, to secure the area and protect the public from harm.

No reason for the riot has been determined yet.

Solidarity With Virginia Prison Hunger Strikers

Solidarity with Virginia Prison Hunger Strikers has been formed to support and publicize the hunger strike being launched by prisoner comrades at Red Onion State Prison beginning Tuesday May 22nd when men in segregation refused their first meal.

Ten Demands of Red Onion State Prison (ROSP) Hunger Strikers

We (Prisoners at Red Onion State Prison) demand the right to an adequate standard of living while in the custody of the state!

1. We demand fully cooked food, and access to a better quality of fresh fruit and vegetables.  In addition, we demand increased portions on our trays, which allows us to meet our basic nutritional needs as defined by VDOC regulations.

2. We demand that every prisoner at ROSP have unrestricted access to complaint and grievance forms and other paperwork we may request. (more…)

Illegal prison cellphones being disabled in Calif.

By Gillian Flaccus
Associated Press

LOS ANGELES — A private company that owns the pay phones in California’s prisons will pay millions of dollars to install technology that prevents inmates from using smuggled cell phones to make their calls instead.

The deal with Global Tel Link addresses the growing problem of cell phones within the nation’s largest prison system, where the technology has been used by inmates to run criminal enterprises, intimidate witnesses and organize attacks on guards.

The move also comes at no cost to taxpayers because the private firm expects to see demand for its pay phones soar, Dana Simas, a spokeswoman from the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, said Tuesday. (more…)

Write to One of the Strong 8 in Support!

Friends, Comrades, and Supporters of the Strong 8!

We just received word that one of the Strong 8, eight prisoners sentenced to I Con after going on strike in the kitchens at Central Prison, has asked for his address and name to be made public so as to receive letters of support, etc. Please write to him and let him know that word is spreading about their situation. His address is:

Chris McBride 0644099

Central Prison

1300 Western Blvd.

Raleigh, NC 27606

Mad love to prison rebels everywhere//Until Every Cage is Empty.

 

Raleigh: Protesters Support the Strong 8

(from NBC17)
RALEIGH, N.C. — A number of people staged a protest Sunday at Central Prison in Raleigh.

The protesters say eight prisoners have been in solitary confinement since December when they staged a sit-down strike over work conditions in the prison kitchen.

The men inside are known as the “Strong 8.” (more…)

Prisoners at Foothills Show Support For Central Prison Strikers

Three inmates in Foothills Prison recently expressed their support in writing for the “Strong 8,” eight prisoners who work in kitchens at Central Prison and were recently sentenced to I-Con (solitary) for their participation in a brief sit-down strike in December.

They declare,

“To whom this may concern,

I am writing in support for the working inmates whom exercised their constitutional right, in December 2011, of peaceful assembly. However, these workers have been unlawfully placed on Intensive Control Status.

This punishment is NOT only constitutionally wrong, but morally wrong due to the requests for better work wages and gain time issues. This letter is a modest request to have these working inmates punishment overturned and that they be released from segregation to regular population. I support the exercise of constitutional rights!

Signed,

Karon Moses

Adrian “Hakim” Jordan

Dakarai McGowan

Support the Lucasville Five Hunger Strike!

The Lucasville Uprising was a historic prison uprising in which black and white prisoners united in protest over inhumane prison conditions.  Out of that five prisoners were framed for murders of prisoners that took place during the rebellion.  They were all sentenced to death and have been kept in solitary confinement and denied even the most basic of rights typically afforded death row inmates.

Four of the five are now engaged in a hunger strike in hopes of winning the few rights they are due before they are executed.

People can keep up with the hunger strike and join in the campaign to support the Lucasville Five by doing the following.

  • Join the Facebook Support Page
  • Sign the online petition
  • Email lucasvillefreedom(at)gmail.com to get connected with the campaign
  • Call or write Gary Moore, Director, Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction
    770 West Broad Street
    Columbus, OH 43222
    614-752-1159

Background Information

Press Conference on Georgia Prisons

A press conference was held (Thursday) morning in Atlanta GA to press for changes in GA prisons. Here is the press release, please post.

THURSDAY, JANUARY 6, 2011

10:30 a.m.Georgia State Capitol, 206 Washington Street

Atlanta, Georgia

NEW CHARGES OF INMATE BEATINGS
Reports from Prison Visits Set Off Coalition Appeal to DOC and Governor-Elect for More Access.

The Concerned Coalition to Respect Prisoners’ Rights, formed to support the interests and agenda of thousands of Georgia prisoners who staged a peaceful protest and work strike initiated early last December, will host a press conference this Thursday. The mothers and other family members of Terrance Dean and Miguel Jackson, inmates reportedly brutally beaten by guards at Macon State and Smith State Prisons in connection with the strike, will be in attendance.The press conference follows reports of violent abuses of these men and others and the findings of fact by Coalition delegations after visits to two prisons in December. These reports have increased fears of the targeting of and retaliation against inmates on account of their peaceful protest for their human rights and raise the urgency for immediate reform.

“These new developments have increased our fears and our legitimate call formore access to inmates,” said Elaine Brown, Co-Chair of the Concerned Coalition to Respect Prisoners Rights. (more…)

Durham Herald-Sun: New Wave of Prison Revolts Likely

(originally printed in the Durham Herald-Sun)

By Neal Richards
Guest columnist

Sometimes big news can happen right under your nose and you won’t hear about it. I spend much of my free time working with an organization called the Prison Books Collective, a Chapel Hill-based group that sends reading materials to prisoners and publishes their writing. And yet it took a hurried text message from a friend to hear about what is probably the biggest prison strike ever to occur in the United States.

Starting on Dec. 9, thousands of prisoners spanning six different facilities across Georgia refused to leave their cells to go to work. In protest of forced work without pay, poor food and health treatment, and a variety of other grievances, prisoners united across racial, religious and gang loyalties to self-organize a massive rebellion coordinated primarily by word of mouth and phone.

After six days of lockdown, during which guards turned off the prisoners’ heat and water and beat up suspected leaders, the prisoners decided to end their strike. The strikers have pledged to take further action if their demands are not met soon. One prisoner was quoted in The Atlanta Journal-Constitution as saying, “We did it peacefully and tried to do it the right way. But these guys are to the point that if this [the protest] don’t work, they’re going to go about it the way they know best [with violence].”

Despite relative media silence around the strike, word has spread, and supporters around the country have expressed solidarity with numerous demonstrations outside prisons. On Dec. 17, a demonstration occurred outside Raleigh’s Central Prison, with protesters banging on drums and holding signs that read “Love for All Prison Rebels” and “Solidarity with the Georgia Strikers.”

The Georgia strike is not just a rebellion against inhumane conditions, but also against a society that locks up more of its inhabitants per capita than any other country in the world. Historically, and particularly in the South, systems of incarceration and policing have been directly inherited from chattel slavery; two of the oldest prisons we send books to literally started as plantations. These systems thus extend beyond prison to the methods of policing and surveillance that permeate our daily lives. The solidarity demonstrations are not surprising: A rebellion against prison is bound to expand in a society in which workplaces and neighborhoods increasingly resemble prisons.

Every week, I correspond with prisoners around the South as part of my work with the Prison Books Collective. Based on what I’ve seen, this strike represents the beginning of a new wave of prisoners’ self-organizing. Considering that the American prison population has grown from roughly 300,000 to nearly 2.4 million people since the last wave of prison rebellions in the early 1970s, the next wave of revolt is bound to be deeper and more widespread.

For those of us who are troubled by this prospect, it is high time to reevaluate everything we think we know about crime, punishment and policing.

Neal Richards is based in Chapel Hill.