Tag Archive: neuroscience

A Leaflet Handed Out in Turin on the First Day of Trial



From informa-azione.info /translated act for freedom now

Today two actions of sabotage are on trial in Turin: the attack on a TAV yard in Chiomonte, of which Lucio, Francesco and Graziano are accused, and the attempted sabotage on an IBM nanotechnology research site in Switzerland, of which Costantino, Silvia and Billy are accused.

However little we care about the deadlines dictated by repression, they can be an opportunity to re-launch the solidarity with the struggles and practices carried out by the comrades on trial. As we stand outside the sterile liturgy and rules of courtrooms, we prefer to highlight what is common to the impulses of those who choose to act in first person, without delegating the urgency to resist the nocivity running through the existent, with or without a movement behind them.

Territories devastated by railway tracks, high voltage masts, nuclear power plants, military bases, gas pipelines and similar projects are the most obvious phenomena of the transformation and commodification of the existent, which is penetrating the very foundations of human communities, ecosystems and the living matter in a less immediate perceptible way. (more…)

Solitary Confinement May Dramatically Alter Brain Shape In Just Days, Neuroscientist Says

A solitary cell at Angola prison in the early 1970s

A solitary cell at Angola prison in the early 1970s

From Think Progress

Solitary confinement has been called a “living death,” cruel and unusual, and torture. Studies of the prison practice of placing inmates in a solitary, often concrete windowless cell for 23 hours a day with almost no human contact, have found that the psychological impact is dramatic after just a few days.

A University of Michigan neuroscientist suggested Friday that the physical impact on the brain could be just as significant if not moreso, and could “dramatically change the brain” in just a matter of days. Speaking on a panel about solitary confinement, neuroscientist Huda Akil said inaccess to inmates has prevented much formal study on brain changes while held in confinement. But she said a number of other studies have documented how each of the factors involved in solitary confinement change the physical shape of the brain. The lack of physical interaction with the natural world, the lack of social interaction, and the lack of touch and visual stimulation alone are each “by itself is sufficient to dramatically change the brain,” Akil said at the American Association for the Advancement of Science annual meeting.

She said particular parts of the brain that are subject to extreme stress can “actually shrink,” including the hippocampus, which is responsible for memory, spatial orientation, and control of emotions. (more…)