Tag Archive: Durham

Prison Books Collective needs a new home ASAP!

We’re an all-volunteer, non-profit based out of Carrboro, NC. Since 2006, we’ve been sending thousands of books to NC and Alabama. We are in need of a new home in the Triangle!! Please help. In March, we lose our current space, where we’ve been since 2012.

A brief description of our needs: a space to store our books, space to store folding tables and chairs, space for letters and office supplies, and room to have at least one weekly workday with 5-10 volunteers. We used to be in a 1.5 car garage, so we can have as small a space as that. We need a space that’s open and accessible to volunteers, that has parking and access to a bathroom, along with electricity (ideally heat and AC).

One idea is to share space with a church or non-profit. We can’t afford rent at this point, although might be able to afford a small monthly donation to offset costs or trade work for space.

If you have any contacts with any groups that have space they can share with us, or if you have a space we can use, let us know!! Email us at prisonbooks (at) gmail (dot) com or post on our facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/prisonbookscollective/

What are our basic needs?

  • Shelves for books along one or more walls (our current shelves are about 18 feet across, by 8 feet high)
  • Climate controlled space without humidity problems and with heat. Ideally AC, but we can deal without. (We’ve worked for years out of garage-like spaces but climate control helps protect books and keep volunteers comfortable)
  • Access to a bathroom (it can be in an adjacent building, as long as it’s open to volunteers)
  • Space for a file cabinet for storing zine masters, and letters
  • Space for 2-3 folding tables and 10-12 folding chairs to be stored
  • Weekly use of the space for a 3 hours session (We’ve always had our workdays on Sunday afternoons, but we can shift if needed.)
  • Parking: about 5 cars, plus occasionally more when we have a group
  • Occasional collective meetings in the space
  • The ability to share the address of the space with the public when we advertise our volunteer workdays via our website, fliers and Facebook, etc.

Our wishes:

  • Occasional access to the space for collective members on non-workdays, to drop off supplies, pick up packages to mail, pick up book donations, sort and shelve books, staple zines, take inventory
  • Ability to receive mailed boxes of books (we occasionally get book donations from publishers, and they mail us the books. They can be sent to the home of a group member, but it would be nice if they could be sent to our space)
  • Occasional book sales (about 2-4 times/year). This would involve: The week prior, storing boxes of books in the space. The day before, setting up. The day of, taking over the space we use for the workday (or another space, if our new home has a different space in mind)
  • Being able to host fundraisers. We had a comedy show once. Maybe bingo
  • Group nights (we sometimes have larger groups want to volunteer with us, and we’d like the option to host them on a different day than our regular workday)

Please share this post with others in your network, let us know if you have ideas for a space (prisonbooks (at) gmail(dot)com). And if you’re able, we’d appreciate a donation to offset costs of the move (and our weekly postage expenses to mail books!).




Man cleared in Durham police officer’s shooting

carlos

From WRAL

— A Durham man was acquitted Friday of shooting a police officer three years ago, with jurors convicting him only of common law robbery in the case.

Officer Kelly Stewart was shot in the thigh during a confrontation with Carlos Antonio Riley Jr. following a December 2012 traffic stop. Stewart testified that Riley was being uncooperative and shot him after the two got into a fist fight. But Riley’s defense attorney insisted that Stewart accidentally shot himself with his own gun during the struggle.

“I believed this was going to happen. My faith, my faith, my faith and prayer. Prayers going up, and prayers come down,” a relieved Patricia Riley, Riley’s grandmother, said after the verdict was announced.

“The truth always prevails over all things,” said Riley’s mother, Karen Judd. “My son always has to be honest. I taught him that. I taught him to treat people in a humane way. During this trial, they were trying to portray him as a vicious criminal.”

Stewart was unavailable for comment Friday, and Police Chief Jose Lopez expressed disappointment in the outcome. (more…)

Zine Machine: Printed Matter Festival

zinemachineFrom Zine Machine

The first ever ZINE MACHINE: Durham Printed Matter Festival is coming FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2015. We’re calling all zinesters, comic artists, indy book writers, and assorted DIY printed matter makers to join us in occupying the historic Durham Armory for a festival of anti-corporate, autonomous, alternative printed media!

What is PRINTED MATTER?
Printed matter is anything that is printed such as zines, comics, prints, chap books, posters, books and everything in between. We’re interested in showcasing work that is DIY, independent, personal, peculiar, or just plain awesome.

(more…)

An Incomplete Timeline of Recent Anti-Police Activity in the Triangle

chmarch1From TriAnarchy

The following is a timeline of anti-police activity from the triangle area in the last few months. We assembled this to help folks in digesting this recent period, connecting the dots of various, seemingly disparate kinds of activity, and strategizing about future efforts. This list is most certainly incomplete, and we would welcome any additions with links, pictures etc., which can be sent to triAanarchy@riseup.net .

Aug 15th – The Chapel Hill Police Headquarters is vandalized by a group of anarchists claiming solidarity with prisoner Luke O Donovan, incarcerated for defending himself from homophobic violence in Atlanta, Ga, and with the ongoing uprising in Ferguson. Police cars are smashed out and spray-painted.

August 22nd – Over 100 people hold an angry rally and proceed to march down Franklin St. In solidarity with the riots and protests in Ferguson. In response to a column in the Daily Tar Heel condemning the anger and tone of the protest, a piece is released online and in paper several days later that defends the protest. (more…)

Protesters claim to dodge Durham police through Twitter

durhampolicedepartment-220x165From WNCN

DURHAM, N.C. –Anti-police protesters claimed to throw off Durham police using Twitter as they rallied at the Streets of Southpoint mall Tuesday night.

A small group of protesters gathered at the American Tobacco Campus around 7 p.m. but then left the area after tweeting they would rally at North Gate Mall.

At 7:30 p.m., Twitter user John Brier (@JohnBrier) wrote in response to a tweet from @NC4Ferguson, “change of plans going to Northgate Mall instead. #BlackLivesMatter #Durham.” (more…)

Durham protests slam police repression

Protesters at Durham police headquarters use flashlights to shine light on police repression.

Protesters at Durham police headquarters use flashlights to shine light on police repression.

From Fight Back News

Durham, NC – About 60 people marched to the Durham police headquarters, Dec. 19, to protest attacks by Durham riot police on peaceful protesters in recent weeks. The march kicked off with the chanting of Assata Shakur’s words, “It is our duty to fight for our freedom. It is our duty to win. We must love each other and support each other. We have nothing to lose but our chains!”

Led by organizers with Southerners on New Ground (SONG), demonstrators brought with them over 500 petition signatures demanding an end to police repression of activists.

In response to the lack of indictments of police in Ferguson, Missouri and New York in the deaths of Michael Brown and Eric Garner, organizers in Durham have led several demonstrations over the last month, the largest of which saw hundreds occupy the streets of central Durham for hours. In several of these demonstrations, Durham police have reacted with force and deployed riot police to suppress the protesters. Adding insult to injury, the Durham police chief has also blamed “outside agitators” for the way protests have unfolded in recent weeks. (more…)

Durham Jail: During demonstration, c.o.’s threaten to beat and taze inmates

durhamFrom Amplify Voices

Hey, —,

I’m glad to hear from someone like you and what you stand for is a real good thing, man. I was sitting in my cell reading the letter you sent me and I seen in one part of the letter you ask me if we could hear or see you all. Yea, we could see y’all outside the jail and on the news, too. I guess whoever has the power over the jail did not like that at all, so they put the whole jail on lockdown meaning that they put us in our cells when we still had time to be out. No showers, no looking at T.V., no phones, and you eat in your cell. The c.o.’s came in and said if we did not lock back they were going to beat and taze us, so we said “Don’t shoot, our hands is up” and we all locked back into our cell. For almost two weeks they were putting the jail on lockdown, and no one knows why, as the c.o.’s say. They taking the V.I. (visitation) from us, saying our fam have to go online to see us. But they still find a way to take our money. Man, it’s crazy, we need help in here!

Thanks 4 lookin out we need you!!! And yeah, I like to read books.

K. C.

Durham Police Department “Intelligence” Report

durham-police-department-profileDear “Intelligence” officers at the Durham Police Department,

We can see by your intelligence report that you’re curious and confused about the nature of this blog in particular, blogs in general, and possibly the entire Internet.

This is the Prison Books Collective Blog.

We link to lots of articles and announcements that we find relevant about prisons, policing and your criminal justice system, both locally and beyond.

You may notice we are not many things to which we link or events that we announce.

For instance we aren’t the Catholic Workers, Trianarchy, News and Observer, WRAL, Truth Out, Peter Gelderloos, Playboy, Denver Anarchist Black Cross, SubmediaTV, NPR, Amplify Voices, ThinkProgress, Anarchist News or Aljazeera; in fact the things that we are not go on and on and on.

We also aren’t your scapegoat. But nice try.

until every cage is empty,

the Prison Books Collective bloggers

Durham: Two days of protest are marked by arrests, prayers

pigscumFrom News and Observer

— On a day when members of African-American churches across the country wore black to protest fatal police shootings of unarmed black men, they were joined by members of four Triangle congregations who gathered in one of East Durham’s most troubled neighborhoods.

The group of about 75 people prayed, marched and blocked two intersections Sunday afternoon in a renewal of public protests against the killings. The event came less than a day after police arrested 11 people during a protest-related attempt to block the Durham Freeway in which police in riot gear confronted marchers. (more…)

One Four Seven: some notes on tactics and strategy from Durham’s recent anti-police marches

ONE FOUR SEVEN

some notes on tactics and strategy from Durham’s recent anti-police marches

On Friday, December 5th, ten days after hundreds of protesters took over the Durham Freeway in response to the ongoing murder of Black and Brown people, Durham took to the streets again. This protest was most immediately a reaction to the decision of a New York Grand Jury to not press charges against the cop who murdered Eric Garner, but it was clearly part of the same trajectory initiated by the August uprising in Ferguson, Missouri. A movement against the police has begun. This thing we are experiencing contradicts itself constantly, expressing itself simultaneously with molotov cocktails, flipped police cruisers, and outright hostility to police on the one hand and platitudes about peaceful protest and demands like body cameras and racial sensitivity training on the other. Nonetheless, a movement it has clearly become. At this point demonstrators have blocked highways and bridges in over 170 cities around the country, sometimes violently confronting police and burning or smashing entire city blocks. The East Bay has not stopped rioting for three weeks. Smaller or less spectacular actions—rallies, die-ins, teach-ins, etc—have occurred probably in the thousands. For many of us, this has become the most important social struggle of our (young) lives. Skills we learned in earlier movements apply now with urgency, and new skills and new ideas take hold at a rapid rate.

This movement was catalyzed and has been led by the uncompromising revolt of Black people, initially from those in a small, poor midwestern suburb few of us had ever heard of. Its central expression is an antagonism towards the white supremacy that defines modern American policing, echoed in the common chant “Black Lives Matter,” but its roots also reach deeply into other realms of class, economy, and gender. These deep roots, and the fact that continued demonstrations are no longer responding to any one single killing but rather a deep-set pattern, make cooptation or recuperation by authorities difficult. What could a single police chief or politician possibly do to assuage enough people’s concerns? What responsible Black leader could possibly lead the country into an era of “humane” policing? Realistically, there are no demands to be made, no leader or party who could “fix” the police, because the police are not broken. They’re doing exactly what they have been historically designed to do.

In line with such a perspective, we’ve focused this account of Durham’s most recent march not on questions of “the political” like making demands or pressuring city officials, but rather on how we can continue building our own power as a diffuse but growing crowd-in-motion. When we blockade or occupy the streets or buildings of our city, what makes us powerful? What are the strategies used by the police to contain our rage during protests, and how can we defeat them? These are questions of social relations, the trust and communication we have or have not built between us, and they are also questions of infrastructure, tactics, tools, movement, and space. Even for those still committed to reforming the police as an institution, with whom we firmly disagree, these questions are crucial, as the only way even modest reforms will take hold will be if we can succeed in becoming an actual threat to those in power. (more…)