Tag Archive: anonymous

Twitter engineer, UConn security analyst among 13 indicted for ‘Operation Payback’

freeanonsFrom The Verge

Some of the men indicted last week for allegedly taking part in the scores of denial-of-service attacks launched by hacktivist group Anonymous in 2010 don’t fit the stereotype of a pajamas-wearing teen hacker causing havoc from mom’s basement.

For example, The Verge has learned that defendant Phillip Simpson is a 28-year-old IT professional who works for a test-preparation service. Anthony Tadros, 22, is a student at the University of Connecticut, who ironically once worked as a security analyst for the school, according to his LinkedIn profile. Geoffrey Commander is 65 years old. And then there’s Ryan Gubele, a 27-year-old who is a former contract employee for Amazon. In June, Gubele began working as a site reliability engineer for Twitter — and is currently still employed there.

Last week, the US Department of Justice alleged in a 28-page indictment that Gubele and the other 12 defendants helped Anonymous, the hacktivist collective, disrupt or cause the collapse of web sites operated by Bank of America, MasterCard and multiple global antipiracy groups. Some of the companies were attacked for refusing to process donations made to WikiLeaks, the group that published leaked US diplomatic cables. Others came under fire for supporting antipiracy efforts. Anonymous dubbed the DDoS campaign Operation Payback. (more…)

Letters urgently needed for Jeremy Hammond

jeremyhammondFrom NYC Anarchist Black Cross

Jeremy Hammond, who is being held right here in NYC, has an upcoming sentencing date. In preparation for that, his support crew is urging folks to write letters requesting leniency from the judge. NYC ABC, in turn, are asking you to help Jeremy and his supporters. Historically, pre-sentencing letters have proven to persuade judges’ opinions in that they show how much support someone has and how valuable they are to their communities. Jeremy deserves to be free NOW, so whatever you can do to encourage Judge Preska to do the right thing, please do it. And don’t forget to pack the courtroom on Friday, November 15th, the day on which Jeremy will be sentenced.

From freejeremy.net:
“We are currently collecting letters of support to ask Judge Loretta Preska for leniency in sentencing.

You can find the template below, or you can download it in either Microsoft Word or PDF formats.

The deadline for submitting these letters is October 15, 2013. (more…)

Hacker who led Anonymous-sponsored hacks against police agrees to plea deal

CabinCr3wFrom arstechnica

A member of “CabinCr3w,” an Anonymous splinter group, has agreed to a plea bargain with federal prosecutors, according to court documents newly made available on Tuesday.

John Anthony Borell III of Toledo, Ohio (also known as @ItsKahuna) had been charged last year for using SQL injections to attack the websites of various law enforcement and public agencies., including the Utah Chiefs of Police, the Salt Lake City Police Department, and the City of Springfield, Missouri.

According to Borell’s plea deal (PDF), which was signed on April 15, 2013, he agreed that his actions violated a section of federal law addressing computer fraud, that he will serve 36 months in prison, and that he will have to pay nearly $230,000 in restitution to the various institutions that he hacked. The 22-year-old is slated to appear before a federal judge in Utah on August 21, 2013, who is expected to give final approval to the plea bargain.

The law appears to be catching up to Anonymous activists in recent weeks and months. Earlier this month, a 26-year-old Kentucky man named Deric Lostutter outed himself as KYAnonymous and provided a written account of an FBI search on his property in Winchester, Kentucky in April 2013. That search stemmed from online activism pertaining to the Steubenville, Ohio rape case. Lostutter’s search marks the latest in a string of occasions where Anons have been caught and unmasked and have pleaded guilty for their actions.

The Strange Case of Barrett Brown

barrett_brown_screencap_img_0From The Nation

Amid the outrage over the NSA’s spying program, the jailing of journalist Barrett Brown points to a deeper and very troubling problem.

In early 2010, journalist and satirist Barrett Brown was working on a book on political pundits, when the hacktivist collective Anonymous caught his attention. He soon began writing about its activities and potential. In a defense of the group’s anti-censorship operations in Australia published on February 10, Brown declared, “I am now certain that this phenomenon is among the most important and under-reported social developments to have occurred in decades, and that the development in question promises to threaten the institution of the nation-state and perhaps even someday replace it as the world’s most fundamental and relevant method of human organization.”

By then, Brown was already considered by his fans to be the Hunter S. Thompson of his generation. In point of fact he wasn’t like Hunter S. Thompson, but was more of a throwback—a sharp-witted, irreverent journalist and satirist in the mold of Ambrose Bierce or Dorothy Parker. His acid tongue was on display in his co-authored 2007 book, Flock of Dodos: Behind Modern Creationism, Intelligent Design and the Easter Bunny, in which he declared: “This will not be a polite book. Politeness is wasted on the dishonest, who will always take advantage of any well-intended concession.”

But it wasn’t Brown’s acid tongue so much as his love of minutiae (and ability to organize and explain minutiae) that would ultimately land him in trouble. Abandoning his book on pundits in favor of a book on Anonymous, he could not have known that delving into the territory of hackers and leaks would ultimately lead to his facing the prospect of spending the rest of his life in prison. In light of the bombshell revelations published by Glenn Greenwald and Barton Gellman about government and corporate spying, Brown’s case is a good—and underreported—reminder of the considerable risk faced by reporters who report on leaks. (more…)