Tag Archive: anarchist

Propaganda By the Screed! One Month Until the Carrboro Anarchist Bookfair

cupcake@The fifth Anarchist Book Fair in Carrboro, North Carolina is right around the corner, on the weekend of November 22. In this announcement, we offer a preview of the events, presenters, and participants, along with a bevy of new promotional materials. Don’t miss this opportunity to join anarchists and other brilliant, beautiful, and courageous individuals from around the world in strategizing against tyranny and celebrating our collective power.

This year’s presenters will speak on topics from encryption and digital security to anarchist perspectives on sex work. We’ll hear multiple perspectives on green anarchism and different kinds of prisoner support. A poet who lived in Cairo through the Egyptian revolution will translate poetry from the movement there; a comrade from Barcelona will speak on the successful struggle against the attempt to evict the Can Vies occupation. We’re especially excited to welcome speakers from St. Louis who participated in the events in Ferguson last August. (more…)

On the Alabama Prison Labor Strike: Repression of a Movement and It’s Aftermath

WMRWCCAerial1WebAs most readers of this newsletter know, in January 2014 prisoners in Alabama went on work strike. This work strike was called for by the Free Alabama Movement (FAM), and began on January 1st and ended on January 15th, 2014. The strike was ended because the message was given that our free world supporters (ACLU, the Ordinary People Society, etc.) were in negotiation with State legislators and that these same legislators had committed to addressing the issues put forth by FAM that prompted the strike.

Then on January 15th, a special session of the Alabama legislature was called that was supposed to address these issues, and the free world supporters asked that the strike be suspended until the end of the session. The FAM in turn asked the striking prisoners to stand down. On the 15th we suspended the strike and the legislators put our issues on the back burner until a later unknown date. (more…)

The Ex-Worker #13: Ones and Zeroes, Scoundrels and Heroes


onesandzeroesFrom Crimethinc.

Some radicals believe the internet prefigures a decentralized utopia; others foresee a new digital feudalism of total management and surveillance. In our long-awaited thirteenth episode of the Ex-Worker, Clara and Alanis take on the recent CrimethInc. feature “Deserting the Digital Utopia,” teasing out some of the limitations and possibilities of resistance that engages with digital technologies. A supporter of imprisoned radical hacker Jeremy Hammond discusses his anti-authoritarian politics and the military, corporate, police, and intelligence agencies he targeted with his hacks. Listeners lambast us on our grievous gaffe from last episode, sketchy cops and masked marchers populate the news, and we announce an anarchist primer competition (even if we can’t agree on how to pronounce it).

You can download this and all of our previous episodes online. You can also subscribe in iTunes here or just add the feed URL to your podcast player of choice. Rate us on iTunes and let us know what you think, or send us an email to podcast@crimethinc.com.

On anarchism, Moral Monday surveillance and The Color Run

GeneralAssemblyprotest_zps20b99b47Editor’s Note: Better late than never

From Technician Online

About 940 people were arrested at the state legislature this summer during the civil disobedience-based grassroots progressive movement called Moral Mondays. T he trials of those charged have begun this month. The first trial, which took place on Oct. 4, occasioned more than just the conviction on all charges, which has been followed since by two dismissals of the same charges last Friday.

Not only did it reveal that the police had spied on the protesters with an undercover cop infiltrating planning meetings — General Assembly Police Chief Jeff Weaver also testified that his department had “collected intelligence” about the “anarchists” among the protesters. According to a story in The News & Observer from Oct. 7, Weaver “testified that his officers had scanned the many ‘Moral Monday’ rallies with eyes trained for ‘anarchists,’” which led to “a murmur of disbelief among the many lawyers.”

 On Oct. 10, the North Carolina chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, the organization that led Moral Mondays, released a statement in which it addressed the anarchist issue: “Now they are suggesting that they had knowledge of so-called anarchists. This claim strikes us as strange since our staff and team were in constant talks with the capital police, and we were never informed of so-called anarchists. To say things of this nature could be construed as an attempt to mar the image of the protesters and to change the message of the movement.”

Commentators of formal and social media expressed disapproval regarding the police specifically looking to surveil alleged anarchists involved in Moral Mondays, holding that such outrageous concerns from the police were unwarranted or absurd. The outcry, though, should be regarding the NAACP’s response.  (more…)