Tag Archive: amplify voices

Seven Ways to Support People in Prison

For many people behind bars books are a sanity-saver.

For many people behind bars books are a sanity-saver.

From Waging Non Violence/ By Victoria Law

I recently received a letter from a person asking how to get involved with supporting women in prison. The return address was from a small town that takes up 2.4 square miles and has approximately 14,000 residents. As far as the letter writer knew, there were no organizations — or even individual advocates — working around these issues nearby. The letter reminded me that not everyone is blessed (or cursed, depending on your point of view) enough to live in a city with opportunities to get involved in advocacy or direct support.

So what are some ways to support people behind bars if you’re not near any existing organizations or grassroots groups? Here are seven places to start: (more…)

Durham Jail: Schedule your visitation with your loved one or friend online!

As is always the case with new initiatives, somebody (in this case, GTL) is gettin’ paid.

As is always the case with new initiatives, somebody (in this case, GTL) is gettin’ paid.

From Amplify Voices

What people are saying so far about this ‘great’ new service:

  • It’s bullshit.
  • It’s another way for them to get all kinds of personal information about people who are visiting at the jail. (Including checking warrants and people’s records.)
  • You have a window of five days: You must schedule at least two days in advance and no more than seven. So, are you expecting people to plan, or not?
  • WTF?
  • They only have so many slots, so you get shut out if they all fill up. It’s made so everyone on a pod CAN’T have a visit.
  • It’s confusing, and it doesn”t work. And the staff doesn’t know how to use it.
  • When you use the lobby computer to schedule a future visit, everyone in the lobby can see all of your personal info.
  • And, the best part: People are waiting as long as ever to get in for a visit.

Check back for more reviews of this great new service, brought to you by Durham County Detention Facility.  (more…)




Durham County Detention Center officials recently reduced prisoners’ evening meal to two cold sandwiches. Many people have reported that prisoners are going to bed hungry every night.**  On Monday, November 24th, 2014, we are going to flood the phone lines of the Durham County Detention Center with calls demanding that people inside get enough to eat.

A phone call takes just a few minutes. Please call!

* * *


Call 919-560-0912 and ask to speak with Lieutenant Colonel Natalie Perkins. If you are transferred to her voice mail box, please leave a message.

HERE IS A SUGGESTED SCRIPT (feel free to modify)

– I have heard that many inmates are going hungry at the jail.
– Two cold sandwiches are not enough for dinner. Prisoners are supposed to receive two hot meals per day.
– They shouldn’t have to buy commissary in order to avoid going to bed hungry.
– At Thanksgiving and throughout the year, please treat inmates with dignity by giving them all filling, hot meals.

That’s it! 
* * *

Thank you for letting the jail authorities know we are watching and letting the people locked inside know they are not forgotten!

Durham: June 11th Solidarity Noise Demo Reportback


written by comrades

On Friday 13th, June 2014, around 8:00PM, an angry crowd of about sixty people converged on the Durham County Detention Center in downtown Durham for the June 11th international day of solidarity with long term anarchist eco-prisoners Marie Mason, Eric McDavid, and all others whom the state has imprisoned. The crowd brought banners bearing messages of solidarity with those inside, one even saying “We Are the Bad Luck” with a provocative image of a cop being kicked, drums, a variety of noisemakers, and a giant crow puppet which waved around visible to inmates, until it eventually blended in with the night sky, creating a witchy silhouette. Bandanas were brought along with “How to Do It” posters, which provided info about how to mask and bloc up properly in order to conceal one’s identity from police or random do-gooders who might be filming. Almost immediately, a pig tried to talk to us, but his unwelcomed chit-chat was stopped ultimately when people gathered around him and drove him away with loud, disruptive drumming.


ALL OUT at the Durham Jail FRIDAY the 13th

durhamFrom Amplify Voices

Statement by Inside-Outside Alliance, June 2014

“Cause summer’s here and the time is right for dancin’ in the streets.”
‑‑Martha and the Vandallas, 1964

“Cause summer’s here and the time is right for fightin’ in the streets.”
–The Rolling Stones, 1968

We endorse the call out for a demonstration at the Durham jail on Friday June 13th and invite anyone to join us in filling the heavy June evening air with the sounds of drums, shakers, kazoos, pots, pans, whistles and anything that makes noise. It is right to rebel, and it is always right to show solidarity with those who rebel in creative and courageous ways. So, we will stand strong for targeted eco-activists and longterm anarchist prisoners, along with prisoners poised to strike at Polk C.I. (in Butner, NC) and, of course, prisoners in the Durham jail.

Coinciding with international days of action in support of targeted radical environmental activists, we are taking the occasion of this lone Friday the 13th of 2014 to show support for the ongoing struggles of Durham jail prisoners and to register our disgust for the so-called protest rules introduced by Durham’s city council this winter.

Freedom Friday to fight repression

What do the cases of Marie Mason, Eric McDavid and other long-term eco-activist prisoners (see june11.org/) have in common with the situation faced by those organizing in the Durham jail against conditions and those on the outside in Durham who have been pulling back the curtain on police misconduct? Repression by state forces. This occurs and can be expected whenever there is a level of success and where official power deems that example must be snuffed out by any means necessary. To honor all prisoners in motion against their oppression, we must also fight what we face on the outside. To relight the flame of popular revolt, we must bring a good mix of Martha & the Vandallas and, if necessary,the Rolling Stones, as always we should.

Although we come in a festive mood to conjure images of a world without prisons and jails, cops, or borders, we also come in a militant mood, because Durham city council attempted this winter to straitjacket dissent and to sow the fear of resistance in the future. What more absurd thing could come from a council which in one breath in late January declares its ‘support’ of public dissent and in the other delivers its new rules of protest? The only thing more absurd is they are not new rules at all, but were only re-established after police actions and the council’s own missteps this winter. (more…)

New Blog Amplifies The Voices Of Prisoners Being Poisoned In West Virginia


(Sent to us from a friend)

I’m sure many of you have heard of West Virginia’s water spill back in January but there’s probably some stories you haven’t heard.

Yes, inmates at the South Central Regional Jail were forced to drink contaminated water, given only between 1-3 8oz bottles of clean water per
day, served food cooked in contaminated water, threatened with medical isolation if they went to the infirmary and punished with isolation when
they demanded clean water by doing a sit in.

At Stories From South Central West Virginia you can read the stories of how the south central regional jail poisoned their inmates, dehydrated them, threw them in solitary, punished them for seeking medical help, denied their medical needs and have continued their oppression of these inmates since the water spill in January in a multitude of ways.

The inmates are seeking long-term medical help and legal representation but most imminently they want their stories heard. Please read the stories of these inmates, friends and family members. Please spread this website and get their stories out.

till every cage is burned,

a friend

Durham: Community Meeting – Tuesday, 3/4, 7pm

community meetingFrom Amplify Voices

COMMUNITY MEETING for family, friends, and supporters of people locked up in Durham jail

Have you had problems visiting your loved ones?

• Visitation times too short?

• Arbitrary times?

• Denied a visit?

• Wouldn’t accept your ID?

• No privacy?

Have you heard about problems inside the jail?

• Poor health care?

• Cold cells?

• Ban on pencils in cells?

• Abusive guards?

You’re not alone! We’ve been hearing stories about these problems over and over, from both visitors and inmates.

On our own, we feel powerless against the jail. Together, we can combine our power and make them change.

Join us to share your experiences, talk with others, and come up with plans for how we can end these problems.

Date: Tuesday, March 4th


Location: Durham Main Library

300 N. Roxboro St.

In the Auditorium

We go marching for yesterday, tomorrow, and today

jesushuertaFrom Amplify Voices

for Jesus Chuy Huerta, Derek D. Walker, Tracy D. Bost, Jose A. Ocampo, and so many others lost.

“The police are the absolute enemy.” –Charles Baudelaire

“The emancipation of the working class must be the work of the class itself.” –Karl Marx

“Fuck the police, let’s hold court in the street.”–many

Since last we were in large numbers on the sidewalks and streets of Durham, much has been said and written about the marches of Nov. 22 and Dec. 19. Now, on January 19th, two months after Jesus “Chuy” Huerta died in the custody of the Durham Police Department, there has been a vigil called to commemorate Chuy’s life. There also is a march prior to the vigil, in order to be visible in our grief, anger, and collective power. We urge those who have not been to previous marches, and who maybe have been quick to criticize the nature of previous marches or who have just been late in recognizing the significance of these demonstrations, to come and demonstrate true solidarity.

It is telling that the vigil organizers have tried to separate themselves from the planned march in every possible way. It is telling in several ways, the first of which is because the Huerta family was supposed to have been the organizers of the vigil. But that was never the case, and it might as well be said. Yes, the church vigil is several things at once: It is the chance for a grieving family to memorialize their son, brother, uncle, cousin, at their preferred place of worship. But it is also quite an opportunity for certain groups and sectors of the population in Durham—let’s call them containment coordinators—to bring their prefabricated ideas to a situation they know little to nothing about. Durham Congregations Associations and Neighborhoods (CAN) and the Religious Coalition for a Nonviolent Durham (RCND) used language in the vigil invitation to make the vigil about their ideas and to effectively, and, they hope, decisively, contain the rage of the family and to thwart the active rage of young people—Chuy’s friends and peers—and put them back on the sideline where the masters of the city want them. The Huerta family is resolute, however, and so are the rebels young and young at heart who have stood their ground and stood up to the bullying police at the first two demonstrations. (more…)

Solidarity shines brightly on New Year’s Eve

durham1From Amplify Voices

I think the protest on the 31st is an awesome idea. This jail is pretty messed up…It is as if it’s a game to them–’I wonder how much time I can take from them today?’ It’s pathetic.”–Durham jail prisoner

Me and my cell mate will be looking for you all on New Year’s Eve.” –another Durham prisoner

Prisoners at Durham County Detention Center saw and heard demonstrators on New Year’s Eve, as dozens of people joined together to drum, chant, dance, and light up the night sky and show their solidarity with those locked up in Durham and around the world. Carrying signs and banners with messages such as “Outside to Inside: You are not forgotten,” “Prison: Slave Ships on Dry Land,” “(Love) for All Prison Rebels,” and “Happy New Year to All Humans,” the demonstrators continued their percussion, dancing and skateboarding for nearly two hours, bringing tidings of love and rage to three different sides of the jail, to facilitate maximum exposure to inmates. In addition to the steady and raucous noise made by drums, pie tins, kazoos, and other noisemakers, a number of paper lanterns were launched into the night sky at different points in the evening, making for a beautiful scene and an apt metaphor: the fire of freedom burns strongly inside and outside for as far as the eye can see–and beyond.

“It was awesome,” a first-time New Year’s Eve demonstrator said afterward. “Everyone had a lot of energy, and the drums are really loud.”


Justice for Chuy means Justice for Everyone / Justicia para Chuy significa justicia para todos

acabnewerFrom Amplify Voices

A statement by Inside-Outside Alliance / Dec. 2013

(Español está por debajo. Downloadable pdfs to come.)

insideoutsidealliance@gmail.com   /   www.amplifyvoices.com

In the early morning hours of November 19, 2013, 17-year-old Jesus ‘Chuy’ Huerta died in the back of a police car in the parking lot of the Durham Police Department (DPD) headquarters. His sister had called 911 at their mother’s request, after the teen had left home in the middle of the night. Officer Samuel Duncan picked Chuy up a few blocks from home. Instead of taking him home to his mother, Duncan took Chuy to headquarters to pick up a months-old arrest warrant for second-degree trespassing. The next stop for Chuy would have been jail. But, in the DPD parking lot, somehow a gunshot was fired, the police car Duncan had been driving crashed into a parked van, and Chuy died.

Chief José Lopez has tried to shift the blame away from his department, saying Chuy died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound to the head. Lopez claims Chuy was handcuffed behind his back and the gun was not issued by the DPD, though he also says Duncan searched Chuy before arresting him. While this story reeks of bullshit and there remain many, many questions to which Chuy’s family deserves answers (at the least), what we must remember and what bears frequent repeating is this:

The Durham Police Department is responsible for Chuy Huerta’s death.

The Durham Police Department is responsible for Chuy Huerta’s death.

The Durham Police Department is responsible for Chuy Huerta’s death.

Police in crisis: a timeline (more…)