Tag Archive: amplify voices

Seven Ways to Support People in Prison

For many people behind bars books are a sanity-saver.

For many people behind bars books are a sanity-saver.

From Waging Non Violence/ By Victoria Law

I recently received a letter from a person asking how to get involved with supporting women in prison. The return address was from a small town that takes up 2.4 square miles and has approximately 14,000 residents. As far as the letter writer knew, there were no organizations — or even individual advocates — working around these issues nearby. The letter reminded me that not everyone is blessed (or cursed, depending on your point of view) enough to live in a city with opportunities to get involved in advocacy or direct support.

So what are some ways to support people behind bars if you’re not near any existing organizations or grassroots groups? Here are seven places to start: (more…)

Durham Jail: Schedule your visitation with your loved one or friend online!

As is always the case with new initiatives, somebody (in this case, GTL) is gettin’ paid.

As is always the case with new initiatives, somebody (in this case, GTL) is gettin’ paid.

From Amplify Voices

What people are saying so far about this ‘great’ new service:

  • It’s bullshit.
  • It’s another way for them to get all kinds of personal information about people who are visiting at the jail. (Including checking warrants and people’s records.)
  • You have a window of five days: You must schedule at least two days in advance and no more than seven. So, are you expecting people to plan, or not?
  • WTF?
  • They only have so many slots, so you get shut out if they all fill up. It’s made so everyone on a pod CAN’T have a visit.
  • It’s confusing, and it doesn”t work. And the staff doesn’t know how to use it.
  • When you use the lobby computer to schedule a future visit, everyone in the lobby can see all of your personal info.
  • And, the best part: People are waiting as long as ever to get in for a visit.

Check back for more reviews of this great new service, brought to you by Durham County Detention Facility.  (more…)

CALL-IN TO THE DURHAM JAIL MONDAY

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DEMAND DIGNITY FOR HUNGRY PRISONERS!

Durham County Detention Center officials recently reduced prisoners’ evening meal to two cold sandwiches. Many people have reported that prisoners are going to bed hungry every night.**  On Monday, November 24th, 2014, we are going to flood the phone lines of the Durham County Detention Center with calls demanding that people inside get enough to eat.

A phone call takes just a few minutes. Please call!

* * *

WHAT TO DO:

Call 919-560-0912 and ask to speak with Lieutenant Colonel Natalie Perkins. If you are transferred to her voice mail box, please leave a message.

HERE IS A SUGGESTED SCRIPT (feel free to modify)

– I have heard that many inmates are going hungry at the jail.
– Two cold sandwiches are not enough for dinner. Prisoners are supposed to receive two hot meals per day.
– They shouldn’t have to buy commissary in order to avoid going to bed hungry.
– At Thanksgiving and throughout the year, please treat inmates with dignity by giving them all filling, hot meals.

That’s it! 
* * *

Thank you for letting the jail authorities know we are watching and letting the people locked inside know they are not forgotten!
(more…)

Durham: June 11th Solidarity Noise Demo Reportback

durmcopbanner

written by comrades

On Friday 13th, June 2014, around 8:00PM, an angry crowd of about sixty people converged on the Durham County Detention Center in downtown Durham for the June 11th international day of solidarity with long term anarchist eco-prisoners Marie Mason, Eric McDavid, and all others whom the state has imprisoned. The crowd brought banners bearing messages of solidarity with those inside, one even saying “We Are the Bad Luck” with a provocative image of a cop being kicked, drums, a variety of noisemakers, and a giant crow puppet which waved around visible to inmates, until it eventually blended in with the night sky, creating a witchy silhouette. Bandanas were brought along with “How to Do It” posters, which provided info about how to mask and bloc up properly in order to conceal one’s identity from police or random do-gooders who might be filming. Almost immediately, a pig tried to talk to us, but his unwelcomed chit-chat was stopped ultimately when people gathered around him and drove him away with loud, disruptive drumming.

(more…)