Tag Archive: Alabama

Former Tutwiler inmate says broken leg not treated for days

ledbetterFrom Corporate Media

BIRMINGHAM, AL –Imagine slipping and falling on a wet floor, suffering a painful fracture in your leg that requires surgery, but not receiving a diagnosis, treatment or even pain medication for more than three days. Imagine only having an ice pack to apply to that injury as it continues to swell, turning black and blue. Imagine being told you’re not “on the list” to see a doctor as your pain goes from severe to excruciating. Fifty-seven-year-old Susan Ledbetter doesn’t have to imagine an ordeal like that, she says she lived it.

In 2012, Ledbetter began serving almost nine months at Alabama’s Tutwiler Prison for Women for drug charges. In May 2012, she turned herself into Calhoun County authorities, pleaded guilty to second degree unlawful manufacturing of a controlled substance and in her words, “wanted to do her time and get on with her life.”

She reported to Tutwiler Prison June 1, 2012 and shortly after arriving, began working in the prison’s kitchen.

Ledbetter, a mother and grandmother, a former truck driver and bartender, has not had an easy life. We interviewed her outside her mobile home in rural Calhoun County, a home she returned to after prison with no power or running water. Her utilities were turned off while she was incarcerated and it took her months to scrape together enough money to get them turned back on. (more…)

A Call for Support from Anarchist Prisoner Michael Kimble

send-solidarity-inside-prisons-graficanera-NO-COPYRIGHTFrom Anarchy Live!

On the 27th of August 2014, I was in a physical altercation with another prisoner and now I’m in segregation for possibly a year.

Anyhow, I need y’all’s support while I’m in segregation. I need y’all to make sure I’m not idle (bored) by sending me radical newspapers, newsletters, magazines, letters, and stamps.

The thing about segregation is that it’s designed to cause pain and hurt, but it can also be turned into a school and place to build resistance. Everyone wants something to read to occupy the mind and not be bored, so it’s a great opportunity to pass literature around knowing it’s going to be read. In general population, prisoners are caught up in their own thing, whether it’s sports, drugs, gangbanging, TV, etc. and have little or no time or inclination to read anything that challenges the norm.

THE WAR CONTINUES!
FUCK THE STATE!
ANARCHY NOW!

[Please do not send books, as only religious books are allowed into segregation at Holman; zines, newsletters, newspapers, and pamphlets are fine. Literature, letters and stamps can be sent to Michael at the following address:

Michael Kimble
138017 / K-9
3700 Holman Unit
Atmore, AL 36503
]

An interview with Michael was featured on episode #24 of CrimethInc.’s Ex-Worker podcast. Click here to download, subscribe, or read a transcript of the episode.

 

UPDATE: Sekou Kambui Released from the Hospital

sekouFrom Denver Anarchist Black Cross

Sekou Kambui has been released from the hospital after undergoing surgery to remove a tumor. He is living and receiving home care in Dothan, AL, and will know of any ongoing treatment to be administered within the month. More updates to follow. Here is to his continued health and well-being!

Sekou Kambui Update:

sekouFrom Denver Anarchist Black Cross

Sekou Kambui, freed after 40 years in prison at the end of June, sends his Thanks, Love, and Appreciation to those that continue supporting him so generously.

After having surgery to remove a cancerous tumor, Sekou is scheduled to be released back to halfway house in the next few days. He will continue receiving health care as an outpatient.

Sekou Kambui will once again receive mail at:
305 W. Powell St.
Dothan, AL 36303

Recently Released Political Prisoner Sekou Kambui is in the Hospital

sekouFrom Sacramento Prisoner Support

On June 30th, Sekou Kambui was transferred to a halfway house in Dotham, AL, but he was recently admitted to a hospital because surgery will be needed to remove a tumor. Below is a message from freedom archives that is more of an extensive update, and it goes into ways you can continue to show Sekou Kambui support and solidarity during these times. We also have a full bio on Sekou Kambui on our prisoners page.

-Sacramento Prisoner Support

FREED POLITICAL PRISONER SEKOU KAMBUI IN HOSPITAL

Sekou Kambui, freed after 40 years in prison at the end of June, sends his Thanks, Love, and Appreciation to all his supporters. Unfortunately, he is currently in the hospital. A tumor was found that was partially obstructing his intestines and digestive process. He is undergoing further tests. Sekou will have surgery to remove the tumor next week. He says that he’s being treated well in the hospital, and looks forward to full recovery and a return to A-1 health.

A reminder – we raised close to $1000 for Sekou when he got out recently. You can still contribute. Make your checks out to William Turk and send them to The Freedom Archives address below.

If you want to send any cards of support, please send them to: (more…)

Demand Medical Care for Free Alabama Movement Prisoner Activist!

call-in

This came in 2 days ago, but calls are needed even more now! Please call in! Call in campaigns save lives!

Black Autonomy Federation received this report from Ann Brooks, the mother of Spokesperson Ray.

START CALLING ST.CLAIR TODAY @7AM 205-467-6111 AND DEMAND MELVIN RAY TO GET MEDICAL ATT.

We are receiving reports from St. Clair prison that my son, Melvin Ray,[one of the leaders of the Free Alabama Movement prison organization] is ill. Yesterday after lunch, Melvin indicated that he wasn’t feeling well. (As you may know, when we went to March at St Clair yesterday, officers were already aware that we would be arriving).

At around 9 p.m., Melvin began having problems urinating and was experiencing pain in his lower abdomen and bladder. At around 11 p.m., Melvin began passing excessive blood through his urinary tract. Melvin has been in isolation since January, and we believe that someone introduced something through his food yesterday.

Melvin informed Off. Cosby of his condition and was told that the medical staff said that he should fill out a sick-call form and that he would be seen by the nurse at pill-call.When pill-call came around at 3 a.m. (4 hours later), the nurse (Holcombe) and officer refused to stop at his door. Melvin banged on his door until Officer Mackesy appeared at 3:10 and informed Melvin that he would have to fill out a sick-call slip (which Melvin had already done, but Nurse Holcomb and Off. Humphries refused to pick up), and that he could turn it in at 12 p.m. and wait to be called by the doctor. (more…)

Time to Speak Up: Women’s Prison Resistance in Alabama

tutwilerBy Victoria Law

Both incarcerated women and the U.S. Department of Justice agree: The Julia Tutwiler Prison for Women in Wetumpka, Ala., is a hellish place. In a 36-page letter that the DOJ issued to the Alabama State Governor Robert Brentley in January, the agency declared, “The State of Alabama violates the Eighth Amendment of the United States Constitution by failing to protect women prisoners at Tutwiler from harm due to sexual abuse and harassment from correctional staff.”

Federal investigators found that, for nearly two decades, staff members at Tutwiler have sexually assaulted women and compelled them into sex to obtain necessities, such as feminine hygiene products and laundry service. Women who report sexual abuse are placed in solitary confinement, where they are given lie detector tests and are frequently threatened by other staff.

But while the DOJ’s letter — and conditions in Tutwiler — made headlines, less attention has been paid to the activism and organizing by women inside Alabama’s prisons. During the department’s investigation, for example, it received 233 letters from women currently incarcerated at Tutwiler detailing a host of concerns about the sexual abuse they’ve either personally experienced or witnessed. This figure does not include the letters that women have been sending to the Department of Justice and other government entities for years before the investigation was launched. When incarcerated, sending testimony letters is a potentially dangerous action. Women risked prison staff opening their letters and reading their complaints — and retaliating against them. Two hundred thirty-three women decided to take that risk. (more…)

Sekou Kambui Released!

sekouFrom Denver Anarchist Black Cross

Update: On June 30th, Sekou Kambui was transferred to a halfway house in Dotham, AL. He is likely to remain in that or another halfway house for the next six months. His transfer represents much more freedom and an end to the retaliation of vicious prison guards; Sekou, however, will certainly continue to need support to meet his basic needs. More updates will come as DABC knows more about his situation.

To the years ahead of working with Sekou outside the walls, and to a world without prisons!

On the Alabama Prison Labor Strike: Repression of a Movement and It’s Aftermath

WMRWCCAerial1WebAs most readers of this newsletter know, in January 2014 prisoners in Alabama went on work strike. This work strike was called for by the Free Alabama Movement (FAM), and began on January 1st and ended on January 15th, 2014. The strike was ended because the message was given that our free world supporters (ACLU, the Ordinary People Society, etc.) were in negotiation with State legislators and that these same legislators had committed to addressing the issues put forth by FAM that prompted the strike.

Then on January 15th, a special session of the Alabama legislature was called that was supposed to address these issues, and the free world supporters asked that the strike be suspended until the end of the session. The FAM in turn asked the striking prisoners to stand down. On the 15th we suspended the strike and the legislators put our issues on the back burner until a later unknown date. (more…)