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Marissa Alexander agrees to plea deal

November 24, 2014

alexanderFrom Corporate Media

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — Facing a possible 60 years in prison for firing a gun at her estranged husband and his two sons, Marissa Alexander agreed Monday to a plea deal that effectively ends the four-year old criminal case against her.

According to the terms of the plea, Alexander was ordered to serve three years in prison after pleading guilty to all three counts against her. The Florida Times-Union reports the Alexander will get credit for the 1,030 days she’s already spent in jail.

That means she’ll have to spend 65 days in jail. Alexander will return to Duval County Jail following Monday’s hearing. She’ll be released on Jan. 27.

Because the second count against Alexander is considered an ‘open plea,’ she could still be sentenced to five years in prison at the hearing on Jan. 27. Read more…

INSURRECTO-RIOTOSIS

November 24, 2014

From Sub Media TV

This week we bring you an exclusive report on the pandemic that’s infecting the globe. Insurrecto-Riotosis. The first wave of the pandemic was reported in the city of Nantes in France following the police murder of 21 year old eco-defender Rémi Fraisse.

This contagion quickly spread to Belgium where 100,000 peeps hit the streets in Brussels to show their anger to a proposed package of austerity cuts.

In Mexico, insurrecto-riotisis is quickly turning into a full-fledged pandemic, as protests demanding the safe return of 43 students kidnapped on September 26th continue to escalate dramatically.

Also, Wal-Mart employees in Los Angeles staged their first-ever sit-down strike against the mammoth retail giant.

And all over Turtles Island, a massive fight-back against sexual violence and rape culture has blown up over social media.

On the music break, a killer mash up of Keny Arkana’s “La Rage” by DAM.

And this week we feature an interview with Andalusia Knoll, a journalist with the autonomous media collective “Subversiones” who breaks down the who, when, what, why, how of the insurrection in Mexico.

CALL-IN TO THE DURHAM JAIL MONDAY

November 23, 2014
dinner

DEMAND DIGNITY FOR HUNGRY PRISONERS!

Durham County Detention Center officials recently reduced prisoners’ evening meal to two cold sandwiches. Many people have reported that prisoners are going to bed hungry every night.**  On Monday, November 24th, 2014, we are going to flood the phone lines of the Durham County Detention Center with calls demanding that people inside get enough to eat.

A phone call takes just a few minutes. Please call!

* * *

WHAT TO DO:

Call 919-560-0912 and ask to speak with Lieutenant Colonel Natalie Perkins. If you are transferred to her voice mail box, please leave a message.

HERE IS A SUGGESTED SCRIPT (feel free to modify)

- I have heard that many inmates are going hungry at the jail.
– Two cold sandwiches are not enough for dinner. Prisoners are supposed to receive two hot meals per day.
– They shouldn’t have to buy commissary in order to avoid going to bed hungry.
– At Thanksgiving and throughout the year, please treat inmates with dignity by giving them all filling, hot meals.

That’s it! 
* * *

Thank you for letting the jail authorities know we are watching and letting the people locked inside know they are not forgotten!
Read more…

Is Solitary Confinement Torture? New Report From UNC School Of Law

November 22, 2014

solitary censoredFrom The State of Things

Long-term solitary confinement is a cruel, inhumane and degrading form of punishment, according to a new report from The University of North Carolina School of Law.

The 225-page report, Solitary Confinement as Torture,  identifies torture as the infliction of severe pain- physical  or psychological- for the purposes of punishing an individual for something they have done or are accused of doing. Lead author Deborah Weissman told The State of Things host Frank Stasio that solitary confinement is a form of punishment “beyond the bounds of human decency.”

It’s a form of punishment “beyond the bounds of human decency.” – lead author of Solitary Confinement as Torture, Deborah Weissman

Students who worked on this report went to prisons and spoke with prisoners who had been in solitary confinement. They listened to narratives from other sources, listened to what experts had to say on the issue and looked for other alternatives. Read more…

Albert Woodfox’s Overturned Conviction Upheld in Unanimous Decision

November 20, 2014

angola32From Angola 3 News

We are thrilled and honored to announce that just hours ago, the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals upheld Judge Brady’s 2013 ruling overturning Albert’s conviction for a third time in a 3-0, unanimous decision (view a PDF of the official court ruling here).

Though the courts have finally ruled in the interest of justice, it may still be months or years before this innocent man is released from his solitary cell.

This is THE moment those of us whose lives have been touched by these men and this case over the years have been waiting for. This is the time when we must call upon the whole of our connections, creativity, and courage to call with one voice for the immediate, unequivocal release of Albert Woodfox from prison once and for all without delay.
Even with a unanimous decision in Albert’s favor, firmly planted in a mountain of innocence evidence, the State can still tie up his release in a number of appeals and even choose to re-indict and attempt to retry him.

Lest we lose Albert to delayed justice, as we did Herman, we must all come together to demand that this nightmare finally come to an end. Read more…

From Occupy to Ferguson

November 20, 2014

1a2From Crimethinc.

In early 2011, in response to austerity measures, protesters occupied the capitol building in Madison, Wisconsin. It was a localized struggle, but it gained traction on the popular imagination out of all proportion to its size. This clearly indicated that something big was coming, and some of us even brainstormed about how to prepare for it—but all the same, the nationwide wave of Occupy a few months later caught us flat-footed.

In August 2014, after white police officer Darren Wilson killed unarmed black teenager Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, a week and a half of pitched protests shook the town. Once again, these were localized, but they loomed big in the popular imagination. Police kill something like three people a day in the United States; over the past few years, we’ve seen a pattern of increasing outrage against these murders, but until that August it hadn’t gained much leverage on the public consciousness. What was new about the Ferguson protests was not just that people refused to cede the streets to the police for days on end, nor that they openly defied the “community leadership” that usually pacifies such revolts. It was also that all around the country, people were finally paying attention and expressing approval.

Like the occupation of the capitol building in Madison, this may portend things to come. Ferguson is a microcosm of the United States. Could we see an uprising like this spread nationwide? It seems almost possible, right now, as the governor of Missouri has declared a preemptive state of emergency and people all over the US are preparing demonstrations for the day that the grand jury refuses to indict Darren Wilson.

Read more…

California Tells Court It Can’t Release Inmates Early Because It Would Lose Cheap Prison Labor

November 18, 2014

jailbreak!From Think Progress/ by Nicole Flatow

Out of California’s years-long litigation over reducing the population of prisons deemed unconstitutionally overcrowded by the U.S. Supreme Court in 2010, another obstacle to addressing the U.S. epidemic of mass incarceration has emerged: The utility of cheap prison labor.

In recent filings, lawyers for the state have resisted court orders that they expand parole programs, reasoning not that releasing inmates early is logistically impossible or would threaten public safety, but instead that prisons won’t have enough minimum security inmates left to perform inmate jobs.

The dispute culminated Friday, when a three-judge federal panel ordered California to expand an early parole program. California now has no choice but to broaden a program known as 2-for-1 credits that gives inmates who meet certain milestones the opportunity to have their sentences reduced. But California’s objections raise troubling questions about whether prison labor creates perverse incentives to keep inmates in prison even when they don’t need to be there. Read more…

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